Thursday, April 28, 2016

Xeriscaping is Essential in Dry Areas

Many homeowners in California are discovering xeriscaping -- landscaping that does not depend heavily on irrigation. Ideally it should be able to exist on rainfall once it becomes established. Until then, it usually utilizes drip irrigation. Xeriscapes are normally heavily mulched to conserve the water in the soil. I'd like to show you how some of my neighbors have used xeriscaping to replace part or all of their lawns. Xeriscaping is essential in dry areas like Paso Robles where watering restricted.  


Xeriscaping is Essential in Dry Areas

That's why I'm moving in that direction in my own yard. So far I've only gotten as far as no longer watering the lawns and adding only drought-resistant flowers and shrubs. Many of my neighbors have already removed their lawns and replaced them. The yard above even looked bright in December. Below is a February xeriscape of a side yard that runs between a homeowner fence and the street.

Xeriscaping is Essential in Dry Areas


Keep in mind that most of these xeriscapes are less than two years old. The herbs which are most often used have not had time to grow and fill their allotted spaces yet.

Another neighbor terraced what was his lawn area and is planting drought resistant flowers, shrubs, and herbs. He's just getting started here on February 25, 2016.

Xeriscaping is Essential in Dry Areas


Here's the view today, April 28, 2016. There's been a lot of growth in just two months.

Xeriscaping is Essential in Dry Areas


My favorite neighborhood xeriscape is in full bloom. I won't show you the February photo, even though that also looks good. I'd rather give you more views of how it looks on this end of April day. Here's the first view from the front of the house.

Xeriscaping is Essential in Dry Areas


After taking the shot above, I walked to the corner to take this diagonal shot that shows more of the plants.

Xeriscaping is Essential in Dry Areas

Then I turned the corner and took this side view shot from Riverbank Lane. It gives you the best view of the olive tree in the corner near the garage. You see the olive tree in every photo.

Xeriscaping is Essential in Dry Areas


Now I'm looking back diagonally toward the cross street. It doesn't matter from which direction you look, the view is colorful. In February the garden was quite empty in comparison. I think many of these yards are works in progress, and I can hardly wait to see them next year when the shrubs and groundcovers fill out more.


Xeriscaping is Essential in Dry Areas

As you see, drought-resistant planting can be beautiful. I personally like this much better than  a lawn. I hope my lawn looks a bit more like it in a couple of years.

Have you started xeriscaping yet?  These books provide some great help in showing you how to xeriscape your yard and replace your lawn with native and drought resistant plants.







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Xeriscaping is Essential in Dry Areas

This is my twenty-fourth post for the 2016 AtoZchallenge, a Blogging Challenge for the month of April, 2016. My theme is plants, since this is a gardening blog. Here are links to the other posts if you missed them.

A is for Apple Blossoms
B is for Bottlebrush
C is for Carnations
D is for Daisy
E is for Elderberry
F is for Flowers
G is for Gazania
Hollyhocks are Edible
Irises Are Garden Survivors
Jupiter's Beard: A Mystery Finally Solved
Kale for Lunch
Lion's Tail - A Perennial Summer Burst of Orange
Miner's Lettuce is Tasty and Free"Naked Ladies" Bloom in August
Oleander through the Year
Plant Pests and their Predators: Aphids and Ladybugs
Quince Fruit from Blossom to Table
Roses Are Not Just Red
Sages Add Color and Attract Beneficial Insects to Your Garden
Tansy and Fruity Teucrium Can be Garden Friends
Urushiol Will Make You Itch Weeds I Love to Hate
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